Why is it that when an object sinks down the water, its weight of water displaced< its weight?

Question
Let’s say we have a Eureka tube. I put an old egg inside and it sinks. This shows that the buoyant force acting on the egg is less than the weight of the egg.

And we know the main concept is that the weight of water displaced= buoyant force.

But shouldn’t the water displace more? Maybe my common sense is just weird, I don’t have a Eureka tube at home to experiment with this.

Thanks

Update: http://imgur.com/a/7u1ur
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General Physics RvTDLR 4 years 1 Answer 567 views 0

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Answer ( 1 )

  1. Why is it that when an object sinks down the water, its weight of water displaced< its weight?

    Buoyant force = Density of water * g * Volume of displaced water
    Since the egg sinks, the volume of the displaced water is equal to the volume of the egg.

    Weight = Density of the egg * g * Volume of the egg

    The reason that the weight of the egg is greater than the buoyant force is that the density of the egg is greater than the density of water. This is because the egg is old. In the past, this is how people could determine if an egg was fresh. Fresh eggs float.

    And we know the main concept is that the weight of water displaced= buoyant force.

    This is true. But in this problem, the weight of the egg was greater than the buoyant force.

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